Common Good Collective

Reader

This Reader is an expression of Common Good Collective, a vision for an alternative way, rooted in the act of eliminating economic isolation, the significance of place, and the structure of belonging. Whether you come at this from a place of economics, social good, or faith, we hope these reflections help orient your day in fresh, provocative, courageous ways. And most importantly, we hope these lead you into the sharing of gifts in particular communities—into co-creating a common good.

We read hundreds of articles and select the best ones for you by sending them to your inbox on Thursday.
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Becoming A Good Ancestor

If I could, I would let you borrow my copy of Cole Arthur Riley’s This Here Flesh, but I highly suggest you read the publisher’s excerpt of the first...

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A Beautiful Resistance

This week, two of our readings come from Cole Arthur Riley. You’re welcome. As introduction, here’s a brief conversation that invites us to engage with our inner conflict. If I...

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Bet on Black Women for Smarter Cities

The image of start-up culture is often filled with tech products and fast growth. Sherrell Dorsey wants us to change our focus on where start-ups happen, and who starts them....

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The Womb Problem

America has always had a complicated relationship with motherhood. Many facets of our culture, collective identity, and moral values are wrapped up in the role and rights of women and...

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New Motherhood, a Dictionary

This Sunday, American’s celebrate Mother’s Day. It’s a bittersweet celebration this year as the contemplate whether or not parenthood is a sacred choice or a law-bound mandate. Namrata Poddar contemplates...

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Trading Our Capes for Quilts

In light of last night’s drafted Supreme Court decision to overturn Roe. V. Wade, it’s important to understand the true historical context of such decisions. I had the pleasure of...

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Nurturing a Narrative

Author and entrepreneur Victoria Scott-Miller was an instant sister when we met three years ago. Interviewing her for this article illuminated another conflict that few consider — economic isolation and...

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“This is what was bequeathed to us”

At first, I learned that a story was a series of conflicts, always this versus that. Later, I learned that a story was a series of disconnections and reconnections. These...

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“Careful”

I went to grad school in downtown Chicago. The only draining part was the train ride home, which often included a combination of Pabst Blue Ribboned baseball fans and caffeinated...

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Pádraig Ó Tuama on Finding Uncommon Ground

Pádraig Ó Tuama is a calm, kind presence. He welcomes strangers like lifelong friends. The word I’m looking for is disarming. In this conversation, Pádraig sheds light on many things,...

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I’m Making Real Change in My City

To make your town strong, build relationships. This piece is called a manifesto, and I think it’s actually a practical guide from someone who has laid a foundation of face-to-face...

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Reflecting on Reconciliation

There is an invitation to reconcile right here, all around us, in each moment.  

Some provide an opportunity to reconcile externally by repairing the damage we’ve caused...

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“It Doesn’t Have To Be This Way”

Songwriter, author, and activist Andre Henry describes his latest song with the following, “This is the new version of my signature song. It Doesn’t Have to Be This Way. The...

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An Unhoused High Schooler’s New Nest

Each of us has navigated this pandemic the best way we know how. Viruses by definition are unpredictable, and fresh data and circumstances have thrown us into confusion more than...

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Helping the Rich Let Go

Over the next 20 years, between $35 trillion and &70 trillion will change hands from baby boomers to millennials globally. This will be the largest intergenerational transfer of private wealth...

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Rethinking our Place

Place often plays an important role in conflict. Who belongs where? Who owns what? How do we treat this space? This reader reflects on how place shapes and influences how...

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“I Have a Dream”

This week marks the 82nd birthday of Herbie Hancock, one of the most transformative figures in
American music during the past 60 years. Here’s a track written in honor of...

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Life and Labor in a Poultry Plant

“One way to deal with that fear is to share stories, and know that it’s okay to be afraid, frightened.” This quotation from poultry plant worker-turned-activist Donna Bazemore perfectly describes...

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Our Trespasses

“Hidden just below the surface of the missionary impulse is the politics of conquest. I inherited that legacy.” Greg Jarrell nimbly this surface tension in his essay about the the...

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Violence, and the Sins of Aggression

The Russian War on Ukraine, “The Slap”, and Holy Week. What do these things have in common? They are all examples of conflict. Conflict, Reconciliation, and Redemption is The Reader’s...

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“Backwards”

One in 15 children are exposed to intimate partner violence each year, and 90% of these children are eyewitnesses to this violence. In “Backwards”, poet Warsan Shire shares her experience...

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“The V-Word”

Violence is often treated like a taboo subject, even though we experience it in its various iterations every day. I have written an essay reflecting on the issue of violence...

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Make the Voices in Your Head Your Friends

Conflict not only occurs in relationship with others, but also with the self. When we are able to navigate such conflicts, however, the results are the same — the fruits...

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Imagine Peace

This week’s Reader is the in our Liberators series. It presents work that calls us to look right at the forces that keep us caged. They describe liberation as bringing...

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